Important Dates

Round II

Submission Deadline(Full paper)Nov. 20,  2017
Submission Deadline(Abstract)Nov. 10,  2017
Author notificationBefore Nov. 30,2017
Final versionDec. 5,2017
RegistrationDec. 5,2017
Main conferenceDec 15-18,2017     

Committee Members

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Prof. Hj. Ramli Nazir               Prof. Yuri Yevdokimov       
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Dr. Mahmoud Meribout     Prof. Khaled Abbas

CFP Flyer

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Venue

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Weather: It begins to turn to winter in mid-December, with dry and clear weather. Average low and high temperatures are 16 °C (61 °F) and 20 °C (68 °F).

Clothing: Bring shirts and sweaters. A coat is needed occasionally when it turns chilly.

If you are a pollen allergy sufferer, be aware the following flowers bloom in December in Hong Kong: pink powder puff, camellia, rainbow pink, poinsettia, big marigold, etc. If needed, use a dust mask or some medicine.


Regal Oriental Hotel 香港富豪东方酒店

30-38 Sa Po Road, Kowloon City, Hong Kong

www.regalhotel.com    


About Hong Kong

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Hong Kong

As a Special Administrative Region of China, Hong Kong is situated on the southeast coast of China, occupying an area of 426 square miles (1,104 square kilometers). The city is one of the world's leading financial, banking and trading centers.

It is made up of four parts: Hong Kong Island, Kowloon Peninsula, the New Territories and the Outlying Islands. The prosperous island is the center of economy, politics, entertainment and shopping with its southern part noted for sea shores and bays. Kowloon is another flourishing part where Tsim Sha Tsui, Yau Ma Tei and Mong Kok are the most popular destinations. The New Territories and Outlying Islands are ideal places to experience a peaceful and natural holiday.

The city has a population of about 6,970,000 and most people (about 97% of the population) are Chinese and speak Cantonese and English. There are few language barriers, making the city one of the hottest travel destination in Asia.

Hong Kong welcomes with an iconic skyline, a legendary kitchen, and lush, protected nature where rare birds and colourful traditions thrive.

Shopping

From off-the-rack Chinese gowns to bespoke speciality knives (and vice versa), the sheer variety of products in Hong Kong’s shops is dizzying. Every budget, need and whim is catered for in 'can do' spirit by a similarly impressive assortment of venues – glitzy malls where the moneyed shop, chic side-street boutiques and vintage dens where fashionistas find their gems, nerdy gadget bazaars, and a mix of markets where you can haggle to your heart’s content. The city has no sales tax so prices are generally attractive to visitors.

Neighbourhoods & Islands

Hong Kong's enchanting neighbourhoods and islands offer a sensory feast. You may find yourself swaying along on a historic double-decker tram, cheering with the hordes at the city-centre horse races, or simply gazing out at the glorious harbour. Over 70% of Hong Kong is mountains and sprawling country parks, some also home to geological and historical gems. Escape the city limits on one of the world’s smoothest transport systems and spend your day wandering in a Song-dynasty village, hiking on a deserted island or kayaking among volcanic sea arches.

Cuisine

One of the world's top culinary capitals, the city that worships the God of Cookery has many a demon in the kitchen, whether the deliciousness in the pot is Cantonese, Sichuanese, Japanese or French. So deep is the city's love of food and so broad its culinary repertoire that whatever your gastronomic desires, Hong Kong will find a way to sate them. The answer could be a bowl of wonton noodles, freshly steamed dim sum, a warm pineapple bun wedged with butter, a pair of the sweetest prawns, your first-ever stinky tofu, or the creations of the latest celebrity chef.

Culture

Underneath the glass and steel of Hong Kong’s commercial persona is a dynamic cultural landscape where its Chinese roots, colonial connections and the contributions of its home-grown talent become intertwined. Here you’re just as likely to find yourself applauding at Asia’s top film festival as joining in dawn taichi or reading the couplets of a local poet to the drumbeat of a dragon boat. Culture could also mean indie music by the harbour or Chinese opera in a bamboo theatre, not to mention the thousands of shows staged year-round at the city's many museums and concert halls.

“Hong Kong has a complexity that defies definition. It's the only place where I can be searching for colonial military relics near the Chinese border, lunching with a Buddhist at a Sikh temple, trying to decipher the aesthetics of Chinese Revival architecture, or splurging on a set of knives – all within five hours – followed by a night of Cantonese opera, karaoke or poetry, anywhere I choose. Hong Kong is so intense and so full of possibilities that I’m glad there’s the rule of law (and an awesome transport system) to stop it from whirling into chaos.”